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EIU Booth Library

Library News

Chicago Manual of Style now available online!

Posted on September 14th, 2020

Chicago Manual of Style

Booth Library has a new subscription to the online Chicago Manual of Style. This well-known reference work, published for over a century, provides authors, scholars, editors, indexers, and other writing professionals with guidance on grammar, usage, and style, including formatting for bibliographic citations and manuscript preparation.

The complete contents of the 17th edition (2017) are browsable and searchable, as is material from the previous edition.

Consult the Quick Guide for sample citations using the Notes and Bibliography or Author-Date styles, browse common questions and answers, and check out the CMoS video tutorials.

Please contact your subject librarian with any comments or questions.

Trial to Bloomsbury International Encyclopedia of Surrealism available through Oct. 10

Posted on September 10th, 2020

Bloomsbury International Encyc of Surrealism

Booth Library is running a trial to the online Bloomsbury International Encyclopedia of Surrealism through Oct. 10.

Through this database, you’ll discover one of the most influential 20th-century art movements. The site includes the contents of a three-volume major reference work with 200 survey articles, 500 A-Z articles covering key figures, 500 rare documentary and archive images, portraits and artworks.

It encompasses a wide range of disciplines, including Art History and Theory, French Studies, Film Studies as well as Literary Studies, Photography, Visual Culture, and more.

Please try it out and let us know what you think!  Feedback may be sent to your subject librarian.

Bookshelves closed for safety reasons, but we have you covered!

Posted on September 8th, 2020

Booth Library is open and ready to serve our EIU students, faculty and staff! However, due to COVID-19 safety precautions, access to our bookshelves is prohibited.

Don’t worry! Our staff will get you what you need! Patrons may request an item be pulled from the shelves by coming to the circulation desk in person; calling the circulation desk at 581-6071; sending an email to bthcirc@eiu.edu; or completing the book request form on the library website home page here. Patrons may also request the retrieval of Booth-owned items by using the request option in the library’s catalog, Primo.

Circulation staff members will email patrons and let them know when their materials are available for pickup. Materials requested by faculty will be delivered to their department office. Patrons picking up items at the circulation desk will need to bring their Panther Card for checkout. Materials will be available for pickup within 24 hours and generally are available within a couple hours.

Post Amerikan available digitally

Posted on July 9th, 2020

Booth Library has completed the digitization of the Post Amerikan, the longest continuously published underground newspaper in America.

The Post Amerikan began publication in 1972 in Bloomington-Normal, Illinois. An underground, alternative newspaper, it was run collectively by volunteers and funded by subscriptions, ads sales, and community fundraisers. The paper was published from 1972 to 2004, making its 32 years the longest continuous publication run for any underground newspaper in America.

EIU Professor Dr. Gary Fritz is leading research into the publication and is planning a documentary. Library staff members Todd Bruns, Stacey Knight-Davis and Tina Jenkins oversaw the digitization of the print editions of the Post Amerikan, on loan from the Bloomington Public Library.

To view the Post Amerikan in The Keep, EIU’s institutional repository, visit https://thekeep.eiu.edu/post_amerikan/.

Booth wins national PR awards

Posted on July 1st, 2020

Booth Library has been named the winner of two awards in the 2020 PR Xchange Awards Competition sponsored by the American Library Association.

The PR Xchange competition allows libraries of all sizes from throughout the United States to enter their best public relations materials in both print and digital categories. Entries are evaluated on content, originality, and design by a team of experts in public relations, graphic design, communications, and marketing.

Two digital entries submitted by Booth Library were named winners.

  • The booklet titled Center for Student Innovation: Creating a Cross-Disciplinary Hub for Active Student Learning in Booth Library won in the Advocacy/Fundraising/Annual Reports/Strategic Plans category. This project was designed to explain the vision and plans for the creation of a Center for Student Innovation at the library. The booklet was completed by an architectural consultant and edited by Zach Newell, dean of Library Services, and Newton Key, director of the Faculty Development and Innovation Center. It can be accessed online via The Keep, EIU’s institutional repository, here.
  • The documentary “To the Moon and Back” won in the Special Events and Exhibits category. The film was created in conjunction with WEIU-TV and the EIU Department of History to complement and promote the library’s spring 2019 exhibit, “On the Shoulders of Giants: The Moon and Beyond,” which celebrated the 50th anniversary of the lunar landing. Andy Cougill, Booth librarian and exhibits coordinator, led development of both the exhibit and the documentary. “To the Moon and Back” serves as an oral history project, featuring interviews from several Coles County residents about their memories of the 1969 moon landing. The film is available to view online here.

The PR Xchange Awards are typically presented during the American Library Association’s annual conference; however, the in-person conference was canceled this year due to COVID-19. A virtual awards ceremony will take place at a later date. The awards program is managed by the PR Xchange Committee, part of the ALA’s Library Leadership and Management Association’s Marketing and Communications Community of Practice.

Programs planned for NEA Big Read!

Posted on June 16th, 2020

Several programs are planned as part of The Big Read program in East Central Illinois. The Big Read is an initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts that is designed to broaden our understanding of our world, our communities, and ourselves through the joy of sharing a good book. Booth Library at Eastern Illinois University received a $14,000 Big Read grant to support a community reading program during the 2020-2021 academic year.

The local NEA Big Read program will focus on the book “An American Sunrise,” by Joy Harjo, the first Native American to hold the position of U.S. Poet Laureate.

Local programs sponsored by many community organizations will take place between September 2020 and April 2021. The schedule of public programming this fall is as follows:

  • Big Read kickoff and keynote address, Sept. 15, 6:30 p.m., virtual presentation, “From Wilder’s ‘Little House on the Prairie’ to Harjo’s ‘An American Sunrise’: Words Matter,” presented by Dr. Debbie Reese, a former schoolteacher and assistant professor who is widely known for her blog, American Indians in Children’s Literature. Reese will look at the story of Joy Harjo, who writes that in 1830 with “the American soldiers at our backs,” her people left their homelands for Indian Territory. Thirty-nine years later, Charles Ingalls took his family — including his 2-year-old daughter, Laura — from their cabin in Wisconsin to Indian Territory. Reese will talk about the works of Harjo and Wilder and ask that we consider how their words shape what readers know about the place called America and the people that call it home. This program is sponsored by Booth Library. To participate, click on this link in your Internet browser.
  • Tarble Reads virtual book discussion, Sept. 16, 5-7 p.m., via Zoom: “An American Sunrise” will be discussed. Free copies of the book are available. Please contact the Tarble Arts Center at tarble@eiu.edu or 217-581-2787 for information on how to participate online.
  • “A Peek Into the American Indian Way of Life Through Their History and Oral Traditions,” Nov. 9, 6:30 p.m., presented by Kim McIver Sigafus: This presentation will invite people into the world of the American Indian to discover what it once was to be Native, and what it means to be Native now. An Ojibwa, Sigafus will be dressed in her traditional Native regalia, and will present on Native culture through oral traditions, language, and history. She will discuss Native encampment life and will drum and sing an Ojibwa lullaby. This program is sponsored by Booth Library and funded through a grant from the Illinois Humanities Road Scholars Speakers Bureau.
  • Book discussion, Dec. 1, 4-5:30 p.m.: EIU Buzzard Hall Room 1180: The Academy of Lifelong Learning’s Literary Divas book club will discuss “An American Sunrise.” For more information, contact the Academy at 217-581-5114 or email academy@eiu.edu. This program is limited to 10 people; pre-registration is required.

Anyone who would like a free paperback copy of “An American Sunrise” may contact Booth Library. The book will be provided to students in EIU English classes, as well as to high schools in the region through the Eastern Illinois Writing Project and Eastern Illinois University Teaching with Primary Sources initiatives.

Additional programs will be added to the schedule and will be updated on The Big Read website at https://library.eiu.edu/bigread. For more information, contact Janice Derr, Big Read project director at Booth Library, at jmderr@eiu.edu or 217-581-7555.

NEA Big Read is a program of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest.

Library catalog search updated

Posted on June 11th, 2020

In collaboration with the 90+ Illinois academic libraries in the Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois (CARLI), Booth Library’s catalog search, I-Share request system and user account system was updated to the Ex Libris company’s Alma/Primo VE Integrated Library System on June 24, 2020.

The change came after more than 18 months of planning and preparation.

Booth library’s homepage remained largely screengrabthe same, with only the “Books and Movies” tab searching the new catalog system. The Booth Library catalog includes searching for books, videos, CDs, and more in our local collection, as well as the option to expand your search to request items from our I-Share network of 90+ academic and research libraries throughout the state.
Library users will find all their current circulation information up to date and current in the new system, so you don’t need to worry about materials you have checked out. Booth Library’s Research Engagement and Scholarship group will be releasing additional information about how to use the system and about changes you might not have anticipated. You may always contact us with questions.

One of the improvements is a streamlined login process that allows you to manage your library loans, make new requests, save searches and create lists and favorites. Another advantage of the new search interface is one you will discover quickly once you perform a search. Whereas the library catalog search previously was limited to searching for books and other materials held in Booth Library, now have the option to search for articles and books in a single search box.
Booth’s Articles tab will remain the same this summer, searching selected EBSCO databases as screengrab imagewell as the option to search JSTOR or Google Scholar, but the new catalog search will provide an additional point to search across many of the library’s databases and subscription content. More information on that expanded search capability will be forthcoming.
Access to Booth Library’s research databases remain accessible and unchanged. As always, the librarians at Booth are working hard to provide EIU with the best and most convenient access to information. You may get help right away, make an appointment, request instruction for yourself or for your class, or collaborate with a librarian on delivering specialized content and instruction.

Periodical Review lists have been posted

Posted on May 4th, 2020

The periodical review for 2020 is underway. The lists of periodical and standing order titles proposed for cancellation can be found here.

Edible Book Festival winners named

Posted on April 27th, 2020

Pictured is the 2020 People’s Choice winner – “Jaws,” by Georgia Ryan, Carol Ryan and Jeremy Ryan

Pictured is the 2020 People’s Choice second-place entry – “Pineapple Couch: A Mother’s Day Surprise,” by Luke Grant, Marissa Grant, Mark Grant and Sher Lanham

Pictured is the 2020 People’s Choice third-place entry — “The Best Way to Identify a Bird Nest is by the Bird in the Nest,” by Jacqui Worden

Booth Library’s 10th annual Edible Book Festival was held virtually to celebrate National Library Week April 19-25.

Because of restrictions due to COVID-19, this year’s festival was held virtually. Participants created an edible art work based on a book and submitted photos of their entry. Then members of the public were invited to vote online for their favorites.

The winners were as follows:

First place: “Jaws,” by Georgia Ryan, Carol Ryan and Jeremy Ryan; based on the book, “Jaws,” by Peter Benchley.

Second place: “Pineapple Couch: A Mother’s Day Surprise,” by Luke Grant, Marissa Grant, Mark Grant and Sher Lanham; based on the book “Henry and Mudge and the Funny Lunch,” by Cynthia Rylant.

Third place: “The Best Way to Identify a Bird Nest is by the Bird in the Nest,” by Jacqui Worden; based on the book, “Peterson Field Guide to Birds’ Nests,” by Hal Harrison.

First-place winner Georgia Ryan, who helped to created “Jaws,” said they were glad the library had the Edible Book Festival again this year, as they have enjoyed attending in the past. “My son, daughter and I had lots of fun making this creation out of Rice Krispies, icing and assorted candies.”

The second-place entry, “Pineapple Couch: A Mother’s Day Surprise,” was created by 6-year-old Luke Grant. “Luke came up with this idea and did the construction on his own except for one grape dog. He had a blast. The green apple is the father, the red the mother, and the clementines are Luke and his brother Mark. The grape dogs are their pet dogs Sally and Barky.”

Third-place winner Jacqui Worden said she used a grapefruit half and linguini spaghetti to make her bird’s nest, and the habitat was made of leaf lettuce and twig pretzels.

Festival organizer Michele McDaniel thanked all of the participants in this first-ever virtual contest. “It was so much fun to see the photos of the entries come in, and we had a great turnout in people voting, too!”

All of the Edible Book Festival entries will be viewable in EIU’s institutional repository, The Keep, at https://thekeep.eiu.edu/edible_book_festivals/.

Recent Losses in the Jazz World

Posted on April 21st, 2020

Two elder statesmen of the Jazz world, Pianist Ellis Marsalis Jr., and saxophonist Lee Konitz have died after contracting COVID-19.

screencapture

Naxos Music Library, Jazz homepage

Through Booth Library’s subscription to NAXOS Music Library: Jazz, EIU can stream dozens of albums and hundreds of tracks  by these legendary artists (and their progeny). You can explore Naxos from these links or anytime from the library’s list of online resources.

 

 

 

 

From the Washington Post through Booth’s subscription to Proquest’s Global Newsstream:

“Mr. Marsalis was a leading jazz pianist in New Orleans for decades, but he did not gain widespread renown until his sons reached prominence as they helped lead a jazz revival in the 1980s. Wynton, a trumpeter who became an outspoken advocate for a return to the early traditions of jazz, has won nine Grammy Awards, is the co-founder of Jazz at Lincoln Center in New York and is probably the best-known jazz musician in the world. Branford, the winner of three Grammys, toured with Sting, led the “Tonight Show” band and is one of the leading saxophonists of his generation. Two other Marsalis sons, trombonist Delfeayo and percussionist Jason, also became musicians, making them unquestionably the American first family of jazz.
“All I did was make sure they had the best so they could be the best,” Ellis Marsalis told Ebony magazine in 1993.
“They did the rest.”

Schudel, M. (2020, Apr 03). Pianist and patriarch of a New Orleans jazz dynasty. The Washington Post Retrieved from https://search-proquest-com.proxy1.library.eiu.edu/docview/2385557215?accountid=10705

screen capture

From the New York Times through Booth’s subscription to Proquest’s Global Newsstream:

Lee Konitz, a prolific and idiosyncratic saxophonist who was one of the earliest and most admired exponents of the style known as cool jazz, died on Wednesday in Manhattan. He was 92.
His niece Linda Konitz said the cause was complications of the coronavirus. She said he also had pneumonia.

album cover image

1949–50: Subconscious-Lee (Prestige, 1949–50) aka Lee Konitz with Tristano, Marsh and Bauer

Mr. Konitz initially attracted attention as much for the way he didn’t play as for the way he did. Like most of his jazz contemporaries, he adopted the expanded harmonic vocabulary of his fellow alto saxophonist Charlie Parker, the leading figure in modern jazz. But his approach departed from Parker’s in significant ways, and he quickly emerged as a role model for musicians seeking an alternative to Parker’s pervasive influence.
Where modern jazz in the Parker mold, better known as bebop, tended to be passionate and virtuosic, Mr. Konitz‘s improvisations were measured and understated, more thoughtful than heated.
“I knew and loved Charlie Parker and copied his bebop solos like everyone else,” Mr. Konitz told The Wall Street Journal in 2013. “But I

album cover image

Lee Konitz Quintet, Peacemeal 1969

didn’t want to sound like him. So I used almost no vibrato and played mostly in the higher register. That’s the heart of my sound.”

Keepnews, P. (2020, Apr 17). Lee Konitz, ‘cool’ jazz saxophonist who blazed his own trail, dies at 92: [biography]. New York Times Retrieved from https://search-proquest-com.proxy1.library.eiu.edu/docview/2390408515?accountid=10705

 

For additional news and information about Marsalis or Konitz, follow these search result links:

Lee Konitz results from selected EBSCO Databases.

Ellis Marsalis results from selected EBSCO Databases.

Related Pages

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Charleston, IL 61920
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